The Dark Six: The Keeper

The Mockery is the lord of treachery and terror. The Devourer commands the destructive powers of nature. The Keeper will strike you down with disease and then snatch your soul so he can continue to torment you for eternity. Everything that we fear—poverty, disease, betrayal, madness, monsters—all of these fall under the sway of the Dark Six. What could drive people to worship these malevolent deities? What sort of player characters would follow them?

In the days ahead I’ll be delving into each of the Dark Six and their followers, starting here with an overview of the Six and a deeper look at the Keeper. Bear in mind that this is my personal take on the Dark Six and the Sovereign Host. It’s not canon material, and it may contradict canon sources.

NINE AND SIX AND ONE

Sourcebooks generally present the Dark Six and the Sovereign Host as if they’re two different faiths, but they’re closely intertwined. The world holds good and evil, joy and tragedy. The Sovereigns need the Dark Six to explain injustice and suffering. When there’s a bountiful harvest, farmers praise Arawai; when there’s a drought, they curse the Devourer. When magic is used for the greater good, it’s a blessing of Aureon; when magic causes suffering, it’s the work of the Shadow. The vassals (devotees) of the Sovereign Host don’t praise the Dark Six, but they acknowledge their existence and power. Prayers refer to the Nine and Six and One, but the point is that the Nine and Six ARE one. A few places where this can be seen…

  • When faced with a deadly storm, a vassal sailor may toss something precious into the water—making a sacrifice to placate the Devourer.
  • The Three Faces of War is a vassal cult found across the armies of the Five Nations. Initiates honor Dol Arrah, Dol Azur, and Dol Dorn—acknowledging that all three have a place on the battlefield, and that each warrior must choose a path between them.
  • The Restful Watch believe that the Keeper and Aureon occasionally work together; at Aureon’s direction, the Keeper catches the souls of heroes so that they aren’t lost to Dolurrh and can be returned when they are needed. The Restful Watch still acknowledge the Keeper as generally malevolent, but willing to bargain with Aureon to serve the greater good.

None of these three examples challenge the basic depiction of the Six. The Mockery, Devourer, and Keeper are still seen as dangerous and dark; it’s simply understood that they are part of the world and that there are times where it’s better to acknowledge them or even work with them than to ignore or entirely deny them. This same principle flows in reverse. A medusa of Khazaak Draal who reveres the Shadow doesn’t deny the existence of Aureon; she accepts them both and CHOOSES the path of the Shadow over that of Aureon. The choice is more meaningful because it is a choice; the medusa doesn’t deny that Aureon may exist, but says that if he does, his laws and attempt to impose morals on magic are misguided and tyrannical.

WHO FOLLOWS THE DARKNESS?

While most vassals acknowledge the existence of the Dark Six, most choose to live their lives according to the principles of the Nine. The ideas represented by the Nine form the foundation of civilization: knowledge, community, industry, commerce, honor, prosperity. The farmer depends on Arawai’s goodwill, and the hunter needs Balinor’s guidance; for both of them, the wrath of the Devourer is something to be feared. Any vassal can choose to bargain with the Six; the common practice of burying a corpse with valuables to distract the Keeper is an example of this. But this is a matter of placating one of the Six when you enter their domain as opposed to revering them.

The question is what drives someone to offer their first devotion to the Six: not simply placating them in desperate times, but idolizing one of these dark powers. In future articles I’ll explore each of the Dark Six, but let’s begin with the Sovereign of Death and Decay: The Keeper.

The Keeper

Sovereign over: Greed, death, hoarded wealth, unfair bargains

Common Subclasses: Death, Trickery (Cleric), Oathbreaker (Paladin), Fiend, Hexblade (Warlock)

Never flaunt good fortune. Avoid arrogance or pride. Those who crow too loudly may catch the jealous eye of the Keeper. Even the mightiest hero can be laid low by disease or ill fortune; the Keeper has a vast arsenal to bring down those that he desires. Once he pulls you down into the darkness, he will snatch your soul before it can reach Dolurrh and and you to his endless hoard, where he can toy with you and torment you until the end of time.

On first reading, this might not sound so bad. Isn’t Dolurrh a place where the soul fades and memories are lost? Aren’t those taken by the Keeper being spared from oblivion? Yes and no. The fading of Dolurrh is an observable effect. But the Vassals maintain that souls that fade in Dolurrh aren’t lost; rather, the fading of memory reflects the transition of the soul to a higher level of reality, where it joins the Sovereigns. So first of all, you’re losing a chance at paradise; second, even if you don’t accept that idea, it’s a choice of oblivion versus eternal torment. So, most people prefer to avoid the Keeper’s grasp. Initiates of the Restful Watch specialize in setting a price on the soul, establishing what must be buried or burned with the corpse to placate the Keeper.

The Keeper is the brother of Kol Korran and reflects the darker aspects of commerce, inspiring avarice, conspicuous consumption, and insatiable greed that can lead to murder or theft.Greed and hoarding are defining aspects of the Keeper; death is simply the tool that he uses to add souls to his hoard. This introduces an often overlooked aspect of the Keeper: bargaining. The Keeper is always searching for new treasures to add to his hoard… and these treasures can include souls, memories, and even more abstract things. A bargain with the Keeper can get you wealth, magic items, the powers of a warlock, or more. While the gifts of the Traveler often have unexpected consequences, the goods of the Keeper are generally exactly what they appear to be: but the Keeper never makes a deal unless the price is in his favor. Whatever you get from the Keeper, you’ll have to give up something of even greater value.

Followers of the Keeper

Out of the Six, the Keeper is the deity most commonly acknowledged by vassals—every funeral acknowledges his presence—but revered by few. Here’s a few ways you might encounter followers of the Keeper in the world.

The Greedy and Devious. Kol Korran is the patron of commerce and honest trade. The Keeper guides those who put their own personal gain above all else. The Keeper helps the liar and the cheat. The Mockery guides those who use deception to spill blood, but those who use guile to gain gold rely on the guidance of the Keeper. Criminals and rogues who see themselves as heroes may look to Olladra for good fortune in their endeavors. But those willing to acknowledge their own greed may offer prayers to the Keeper.

This sort of worship is typically a personal thing. Many members of the Boromar Clan offer prayers to the Keeper, but the clan doesn’t maintain a shrine to him. Individuals who are especially skilled at separating people from their riches may be considered to be blessed by the Keeper, just as a skilled blacksmith may be thought to be favored by Onatar; they may not have the trappings of a priest, but others may still ask for (and pay for) their blessing. On the other hand, you could also have a priest of the Keeper who runs their own guild of thieves; the critical point is that such a priest would typically see their congregation as tools to further their own greed. A cleric following this aspect of the Keeper would have the Trickery domain, but it’s just as appropriate for any rogue, criminal, or charlatan.

While a player character could follow this path, there’s little heroic about it. The Keeper is the lord of greed. Kol Korran governs the positive aspects of trade, and Olladra guides the playful trickster and bard. The Keeper is the patron of those concerned solely with their own personal gain regardless of the cost to others. However, it’s still possible for a mercenary character to begin their career as a cold-hearted devotee of the Keeper—fighting solely for gold—and to perhaps discover that there are things more important than simple acquisition along the way.

The Restful Watch. Priests of the Restful Watch specialize in embalming, funerals, and maintaining cemeteries. They can be found in every major city in the Five Nations, and even smaller towns may have a devotee of the Watch tending the boneyard. The doctrine of the Restful Watch is based on the idea that most spirits pass through Dolurrh and into the realm of the Sovereigns, but that once someone has entered the realm of the Sovereigns they can never return. As a result, if Aureon knows that a dead hero will be needed in the future, he has the Keeper snatch the soul before it reaches Dolurrh, so it can be restored when the time is right. Thus, initiates of the Restful Watch present themselves first and foremost as servants of Aureon, but they understand the Keeper. One of their most important duties is helping the bereaved choose appropriate grave goods or a sacrifice sufficient to distract the Keeper and ensure that the soul reaches Dolurrh. For a simple person with few achievements, a single coin might suffice; but the more remarkable the deceased, the greater interest the Keeper will have… requiring a more significant sacrifice to distract him.

While the Restful Watch can be found in any major city, they maintain a low profile; unless you’re planning a funeral, there’s little reason to interact with them. However, there’s a few ways that they could intersect with adventurers or serve as the foundation for a player character. Clerics of the Restful Watch typically take the Grave domain, reflecting their balance between the light of Aureon and the darkness of the Keeper. However, both the Knowledge domain and the Death domain are options. Likewise, Watch paladins typically embrace the Oaths of Devotion or Redemption, but those especially close to the Keeper could take the darker path of the Oathbreaker. With that in mind, here’s a few options for the Watch.

  • The Restful Watch believes that Aureon has preserved the souls of heroes so they may return for an apocalyptic conflict that lies ahead. Many scholars believe this cataclysm predicts the collapse of the Silver Flame and the unleashing of the Overlords of the First Age. As a Watchful Eye, you have been sent out into the world to search for signs that this cataclysm is drawing nigh. You may have a specific set of things you’re supposed to look for or investigate (such as the Mournland), or you could be largely given a free rein.
  • Occasionally the Watch identifies individuals who they’re sure have been marked by Aureon for preservation. You may have been assigned to such an individual—one of the other player characters—with the task of chronicling this person’s life and performing the proper rituals when they die. Whether or not the person appreciates or wants your companionship is irrelevant. “Don’t mind me, I’m just going to follow you around until your heroic death. Trust me, I think you’re going to accomplish some big things!”
  • Especially gifted priests of the Restful Watch serve as exorcists and mediums. As a cleric with the Grave domain, you may consider it your holy purpose to seek out the undead and lay their troubled spirits to rest.

Keeper’s Hands. Dedicated priests of the Keeper can be found in Droaam, Darguun, and even in Zilargo or the Lhazaar Principalities. These priests generally take the place of the Restful Watch, though they lack the benevolent aspect of Aureon. They still perform funerals and tend cemeteries, but they have no qualms about presenting themselves as servants of the the Keeper as opposed to being tied to some greater good. Like the Restful Watch, they will set a price for a soul’s passage; however, this will definitely include profit for the priest. In such places it’s generally accepted that one can gain the Keeper’s favor by sending him choice souls, either by simple dedication (which anyone can try—”Keeper take your soul!”) or more thorough ritual… so if you don’t pay the Keeper’s Hand to ensure the soul’s passage to Dolurrh, they’ll sell the soul to the Keeper themselves. Necromancy is also a common path for Keeper’s Hands, whether they are adepts, clerics (Death domain) or Oathbreaker paladins. They see necromancy as an earned gift from the Keeper and consider it the necromancer’s right to compel the dead to service… so, a far cry from the Restful Watch seeking to lay the dead to rest.

A Keeper’s Hand doesn’t see any of this as evil. It’s just the way the universe works. Life and death are business transactions, and a Keeper’s Hand is a merchant who expects to profit from them. Keeper’s Hands may also serve as talons (see Bargaining With The Keeper). As a path for a PC, you may have been raised in one of these dark cultures and simply be trying to use your gifts for your own benefit. Working with a mercenary band of violent adventurers is an excellent way to be around death—and you’re happy to dedicate those deaths to the Keeper in hope for favor.

While this focuses on the DEATH aspect of the Keeper, Keeper’s Hands are also often shrewd negotiators. Especially in more civilized regions, a Keeper’s Hand may be involved with smuggling or managing other criminal enterprises in addition to their religious duties. As a lone wolf adventurer, you could likewise be focused on all things that could bring you profit. There’s no reason you can’t be willing to share these profits with your friends, as long as you get what you want—so again, a Keeper’s Hand can be an excellent match for mercenary adventurers driven primarily by profit.

Keeper’s Fangs. The Keeper’s Hand simply pursues general profit, dedicating any deaths they can to the Keeper and hoping that this earns them favor. However, a few individuals feel a closer connection to the Keeper—they hear his voice or know what he wants most of all. Known as Keeper’s Fangs, these assassins hunt down and slay anyone marked by the Keeper. They may also be charged to find treasures the Keeper wants to add to his hoard. It’s up to the DM to decide if such a treasure must be immediately sacrificed upon acquisition, or if the Fang can make use of the relic before it is claimed by the Keeper.

In the ancient Sarlonan nation of Pyrine, Keeper’s Fangs were assassins who would sell death for gold. Assassination isn’t sanctioned in the Five Nations, but there is an order of Keeper’s Fangs who follows these old traditions. They are few enough in number that House Thuranni generally doesn’t see them as a threat to business. While this order exists, there are just as many Keeper’s Fangs who have an entirely personal relationship with the Keeper: they see what he wants in visions, and act in the hopes of personal reward. This is a logical path for a Hexblade warlock, whose shadow-infused weapons are a gift from the Keeper. However, it’s just as plausible for a Death cleric, Oathbreaker paladin, or rogue assassin.

Others. As noted above, these are a FEW ways to encounter followers of the Keeper. These ideas follow the traditional Pyrinean interpretation of the Six; but the Sovereigns and Six have been interpreted in many ways in various cultures. Among the giants of Rusheme, the Keeper is known as Karaak the Final Guardian, and considered to save the souls of the worthy from dissolution—similar to the beliefs of the Restful Watch, but without adding Aureon into the equation. The Keeper is always associated with death and greed, but the exact interpretation can vary considerably.

Bargaining With The Keeper

How do bargains with the Keeper work? The Six don’t walk the world, so you have to find an intermediary who can make a bargain. This could be a devoted outsider, or it could be a mortal with a strong connection to the Keeper. This could fall into any of the categories described above—a priest of the Restful Watch, a criminal considered to be blessed by the Keeper, a Keeper’s Hand or Fang. Someone operating in this capacity is referred to as a talon. Despite all of these options, talons are exceptionally rare—and those with established track records even more so. This is because working with a talon is entirely a matter of faith. The petitioner comes with a request. The talon establishes the exact terms. Payment is often abstract: the most common fee is the assurance that the Keeper will claim the petitioner’s soul after death, often with an added limitation on maximum lifespan (“Should you live to be forty years of age, the Keeper will end your life and claim his rightful prize”). But payment could be something unique that the petitioner possesses, whether physical or metaphysical. The only constant is that the Keeper never makes a bargain unless the price is in his favor; the cost will always be dear.

If a bargain has a material cost, the talon takes the goods on behalf of the Keeper. But the talon doesn’t provide the reward, and there’s no guarantee as to when the Keeper will uphold his end of the bargain. So an aspiring merchant could make a deal to acquire wealth and success in exchange for a 40-year lifespan and the only picture of her mother. The talon takes the picture and the merchant goes on her way. Within the year, she has a run of good fortune, or finds a wealthy investor, or stumbles upon buried treasure that allows her to set up her business. Is this the result of the bargain, or just coincidence? WILL she die when she’s forty, or is that also just superstition? An established talon is defined by having a string of successes; people have to BELIEVE that the talon can speak for the Keeper. But the Keeper acts in his own time and in his own way, and there’s nothing about a talon’s bargain that can’t be questioned by a skeptic.

A Keeper’s bargain is an excellent way to establish a character’s backstory. Player characters possess remarkable talent; did a character bargain for that talent, and if so, what was the cost? Perhaps the terms of the agreement only give the character one year to live: can they find a way to break the bargain before time runs out? This is also a possible explanation for the powers of a warlock, especially if the warlock specializes in conjuration and necromancy. In this case the warlock may not have an active and ongoing relationship with their patron (though the following section presents alternatives) but what were the terms of the deal? If a player character wants to make a bargain with a talon during a campaign, it’s up to the DM to decide what terms the Keeper will offer and what the practical effects will be. If someone offers to give up their musical talent in exchange for a silver tongue, the DM could allow them to swap a proficiency with Performance for Deception… but again, it’s up to the DM to decide if such a thing is possible and how to implement it. If someone bargains for “skill at arms” the DM could rule that this skill will be acquired over time as they gain levels; again, the benefit doesn’t have to come instantly, and most people can’t gain levels as PCs do. It’s also possible that a talon could approach the player characters with an offer. Perhaps they’ve acquired the Book of Vile Darkness and no one actually wants to read it. But a talon approaches them; the Keeper has spoken to them and wants the book, and is offering a different artifact in exchange. Are they interested? And again, such a bargain doesn’t mean that the talon possesses the other artifact; it’s simply assured that should the PCs give the book to the talon, the other artifact will come to them. Metaphysically, the theory is that most of the gifts the Keeper can bestow come from imbuing the beneficiary with an element of one of the souls in his hoard; the Keeper grants musical talent by imbuing the seeker with the soul of a renowned bard. As such, there are certainly things the Keeper CAN’T grant. The Keeper can’t granted arcane knowledge that no mortal has discovered; that would be the domain of the Shadow.

The Keeper and the Afterlife

DOES the Keeper snatch souls on their way to Dolurrh? As with anything tied to the divine, there’s no absolute proof. But from the preponderance of myths to the concrete fact of soul-trapping Keeper’s fang weapons, it’s POSSIBLE for souls to be lost in this way. There are tales told of heroes finding the Lair of the Keeper in the Demon Wastes and negotiating with a skeletal dragon to recover souls lost to Keeper’s Fangs. Perhaps these stories are literally true. Or perhaps the “Lair of the Keeper” is a portal to a demiplane ruled by the first and most powerful dracolich… and this mighty creature created the Keeper’s fangs. Ultimately it’s up to the DM to decide. Is there anything to a talon’s bargains beyond superstition and coincidence? Can souls be taken by the Keeper, and if so, how can they be recovered?

In this article I discuss the cost of resurrection—whether cast as a spell, or offered to a slain hero by supernatural forces. In Eberron, this is one more opportunity to bargain with the Keeper. Should a player character die early in their career, the Keeper (or something posing as him) could offer resurrection—but at what cost? Alternately, if the player characters have the ability to raise the dead, the Keeper can add an unexpected obstacle. If the Keeper claims a soul, Raise Dead won’t work unless the Keeper chooses to release the soul… which will require a bargain. See the linked article for ideas about what such bargains could entail!

This adds one more interesting background for a player character: the REVENANT. Even as a first level character, you could have died and been released by the Keeper… what bargain did you make? Is this tied to your class abilities? Did you die recently, or did you linger in limbo for centuries before returning—exactly what the Restful Watch describes? This could allow you to play an elf from the age of Aeren; a human who fought along Lhazaar, Galifar, or Tira Miron; a Goblin who fought the daelkyr; or any other hero from the past. This could have required a bargain with the Keeper (or something claiming to be the Keeper)… or perhaps there is something to the beliefs of the Restful Watch and you’ve been returned without strings—but if so, why were you preserved and why have you been restored now? What’s your purpose in the present day?

Q&A

I love the idea of people burying treasures with the dead to distract the Keeper. If this is a common practice for everyone in Eberron, would you think it would lead to extensive grave robbing by non-believers? Is there some “curse” rumored to go with grave robbing?

Good question. It’s definitely seen as a bad idea to steal grave goods—even if the Keeper doesn’t physically take them, his eye has been on them and by taking them you’re drawing his eye to you. However, that’s only going to deter vassals; if someone doesn’t believe in the Keeper, they won’t believe in the curse. With that said, bear in mind that for MOST people we aren’t talking about things of tremendous value—a few copper crowns, something that was valuable to the deceased but doesn’t necessarily have high market value. if the thing that was most valuable to the deceased was a portrait of their lost child, that might suffice… even though you couldn’t get a great price for it. Beyond that, this is one of the specific duties of the Restful Watch—maintaining and protecting cemeteries.  And in the case of someone who would be buried with things of considerable value—a noble, a hero—you would have crypts with actual security.

All of which leads to possible adventure: You need to get into the crypt of first King of Metrol to recover the sword that was buried with him… but is its power intact, or is it now cursed?

If you were to create a 3.5 lawful good paladin of the Keeper, what positive aspects of the Keeper would you emphasize? Or would you prefer they be a Paladin of the Restful Watch instead?

It’s a tough sell. I personally define the good alignments as reflecting empathy and altruism, and altruism is literally the antithesis of the Keeper. Even the Restful Watch doesn’t present the Keeper as an altruist; he’s just willing to work with Aureon, presumably profiting from the deal in some way. To me, the people who worship one of the Six above the Sovereigns don’t try to change the basic message of the Six, they simply embrace the darkness. The merchant who follows the Keeper is a mirror of the “Greed is Good” stockbroker, or the con artist who believes that if they can fool you, they’ve earned your gold. So personally, I’d go with the Restful Watch.

HOWEVER, if I absolutely had to make an LG paladin of the Keeper who wasn’t associated with the Restful Watch, I’d emphasize the role of the Talon. They help people make bargains with the Keeper. They don’t seek personal profit, and they offer the best advice they can to the prospective client. It could be that the paladin then acts to make the deal come true; if the Keeper has promised someone wealth, it’s up to the paladin to actual get it for them. So essentially, even though the Keeper always gets the best of the bargain, the paladin sees themselves as doing good by helping people make the deals to get what they need.

A general question about the Dark Six: How do you present them as being worshipped as a pantheon? Usually things focus on cults dedicated to individual members of the Six. 

I lean towards the Nine and Six and One. Rather than say “There is a group that explicitly worships all six of the Dark Six and denies the Sovereigns,” I lean towards “There is a pantheon of fifteen deities, which ones appeal to the individual?” For example, a gnoll hunter in Droaam might respect the Keeper and the Shadow, but as a hunter they could also offer thanks to the Lord of Hunt and Horn—which is to say, Balinor. While Balinor is traditionally part of the Nine, if you’re a hunter, he’s your patron. The Devourer doesn’t guide the hunter; he resides in the storm and the wildfire. The gnoll might RESPECT the Devourer, but if he’s looking for guidance in the hunt, that’s not what the Devourer does.

Essentially, with any of the Sovereigns and Six, there will be members of the pantheon who are more relevant to your life than others. If you’re not a soldier you don’t have a lot of reasons to invoke the Three Faces of War. If you’re not an artisan you may never have a need to ask Onatar for guidance. The same holds true with the Six. The Keeper is relevant to everyone, because we all die. The Shadow is generally seen as the patron of monsters and thus is broadly relevant to all of the denizens of Droaam. But the Devourer and the Fury are more specialized and typically only invoked when needed.

With that said, there are certainly cults in the Five Nations who take it as a point of pride that they follow the Six instead of the Nine. Typically this is seen as a statement of freedom and independence. The Nine are tied to the typical rules of civilization; law, honor, duty, commerce. The Six embody the things we fear, the forces that defy civilization. Someone who embraces the Six is stating that they choose to stand with these forces… even if they may never actually invoke the Devourer directly.

How do followers of the Blood of Vol feel about the Keeper? 

This is a case where people say “They both use necromancy, so they must be allies, right?” WRONG. Many followers of the Blood of Vol maintains that mortality is a curse set on the world by cruel gods… and the Keeper is a cruel god who inflicts death and suffering. The Keeper grants power over the dead, but the Blood of Vol sees the entire idea of the Keeper and any who would revere him as abominations.

What makes The Keeper and Katashka: the Gatekeeper definitely different beings and sources of power to the dragons?

Katashka the Gatekeeper is one of the Overlords of the First Age, an archfiend embodying the fears of death and undeath. There’s certainly some overlap, and one of the common theories is that the inspiration for the Keeper was a draconic champion of the First Age who bargained with Katashka and became the first dracolich—and that this entity could be the inhabitant of the Lair of the Keeper in the Demon Wastes. But there are critical differences between the two. Again, Katashka is a fiend who embodies our fears of death and undeath. If freed from his bonds, Katashka would create a blighted realm in which undead prey upon the living. Katashka is in essence a predator who strikes indiscriminately, spreading the influence of the dead across his domain. He is a source of necromantic power, certainly, but he’s an immortal fiend—not something a dragon could aspire to become.

By contrast, the Keeper is the embodiment of greed… it just happens that one of the things he covets is souls, and he uses death and disease as a way to acquire them. The Thir archetype tied to the Keeper is the Master of the Hoard; dragons who emulate the Keeper “treat life and death as simple negotiations and collect actual souls.” As a general rule, Katashka isn’t interested in bargaining or acquiring PARTICULAR souls; he’s all-consuming. The Keeper is a connoisseur who relishes his hoard and who’s always interested in a bargain. And of course, dragons believe that it’s possible for an exceptional Master of the Hoard to BECOME the new Keeper.

My question would be what kind of monsters or monstrous humanoids would have an association with the Keeper? 

It’s not generally a strict racial connection. There are Keeper’s Hands in Droaam and Darguun, but they aren’t tied to a particular species. Medusas revere the Shadow, but in Graywall the primary priestess of the Keeper is a medusa. Essentially, it’s the same principle as anyone worshipping the Sovereign Host; offer devotion to the deities you feel govern your situation or whose guidance you seek. Culturally many of the inhabitants of Droaam are more comfortable with death and with open greed than people of the Five Nations. Humans usually embrace Kol Korran over the Keeper because they want to feel that they are the hero of the story—clever, certainly, but not rapacious or cruel. Following the Keeper acknowledges that you put your own desires ahead of all others. And again, while there are Keeper’s Hands in Droaam, there’s also Keeper’s Hands in Zilargo or Lhazaar.

With all that said, a monstrous race that lives on the edge of life and death or is closely aligned with negative energy could see themselves as children of the Keeper. I can’t think of one off the top of my head, but maybe I’m missing one.

Post your questions and comments about the Keeper below! And thanks as always to my Patreon supporters for making this possible!

35 thoughts on “The Dark Six: The Keeper

  1. While this might be getting ahead, a question about Changelings. Changelings are usually associated with The Traveler, but are there any broad trends for how Changelings feel about the rest of the six? (Well, in this case, The Keeper)

    • Changelings have a broad association with the Traveler because the Traveler embodies CHANGE, and in many myths is the source of changelings. Changelings have no particular affinity for death or greed, so they don’t have any culturally distinct relationship to the Keeper.

  2. Are you able to expand on the Keeper as the Giants of Xendrik see him?. Since they seem to see the Keeper as no being evil.

    • Actually i’d love if someday they expanded on the way the Giants of Xendrik saw the Nine & Six .. but that might be asking a bit much. XD

    • The Rusheme beliefs mirror the Restful Watch. “The giants say that Karrak measures each life at the moment of death, considering past deeds and the unfulfilled destiny of the soul. He saves the worthy souls from disappearing into the greater whole of Rushemé, preserving them in his realm until they are needed on Eberron once again.” Essentially, they drop the “Greed” aspect, but keep the aspect that he can preserve souls from dissolution and return them when they’re needed.

  3. Question about the relation and contrast between The Keeper and Katashka: The Gatekeeper, the Overlord of the First Age.

    The latter is often described as an inspiration for the former. Their domains and stories about them certainly seem to overlap. However the one notable culture who would know about Katashka, the Dragons of Argonessen (after all they still have to live with The Harvest of Pain) certainly see a distinct difference between the Thir religion’s Sovereign Archetype of The Keeper and their hated foe Katashka: The Gatekeeper.

    Long way of asking “What makes The Keeper and Katashka: the Gatekeeper definitely different beings and sources of power to the dragons?”

  4. Thanks Keith and happy new year!

    My question would be what kind of monsters or monstrous humanoids would have an association with the Keeper? I’m aware of how monsters with spell-like abilities feel they are gifts from the Shadow but are there monstrous races that associate with the Keeper?

      • Just to add I thought your idea in The Queen of Stone about Znir Pact gnolls collecting trophies from fallen foes for the afterlife gave them a connection to The Keeper. Since hyenas are so closely tied with scavenging in popular culture.

        • Ghyrryn says “The Keeper takes us all.” I don’t see this as a particular reverence for the Keeper, but rather a simple statement of fact: We all die eventually. The Znir acknowledge the power of the Keeper, but I think they’d acknowledge the Shadow and the Devourer as equals.

  5. Keith, how is the relationship between followers of The Dark Six with the undead different from followers of the Blood of Vol with the undead? Would followers of The Keeper see it as a way sanctioned by The Keeper to preserve someone for a time of great need or as something else depending on circumstance?

  6. Question about the dark six: how would be a cult who worships them as a pantheon? They are usually presented as having each their own sects.

  7. Some months ago, talking about “what cleric in eberron could have the HUNGER domain?” You suggested the keeper. Would you develop this possibility?

    • I don’t actually have access to the Hunger domain, so it’s hard for me to explore the idea in detail. From what I gather it’s largely tied to ghouls and grants the cleric a bite attack? The Keeper is driven by greed and avarice; one could easily present hunger as a form of this, and look to a hunger cleric as a form of Keeper’s Fang.

  8. I had a question regarding the Dark Six in general but I might as well ask it here in case the Keeper pertains. In an article on WotC years ago you talked about how the 3.5 class Beguiler fits into Eberron, and one of my favourite manifestations of that is the sheelidar

    “In Droaam and the Shadow Marches, a few children spontaneously manifest beguiler talents; traditionally, these gifts are seen as the touch of the Dark Six, and these youths are often claimed by priests and raised to revere the Six. These natural beguilers are known as sheelidar — “six-fingered hands” — and a few actually do have an extra digit on hands and feet.”

    A) If I wanted to play a sheelidar in 5e would you say that it’s more a sorcerer, bard or warlock?

    B) Obviously enchantment and illusion focused casters are in good with the Shadow, but what about the other five? Would such a blessed character be looked upon much like a Keeper’s Hand or are they too generalist to take on the traits of one sect or another’s traits?

    • It’s a difficult choice. I’d probably do a warlock, personally. I’d say that their powers would determine if they’re tied to a particular patron; a sheelidar with necromantic spells could be seen as touched by the Keeper.

  9. I never game much thought to the Dark Six, they never seemed like the sort of thing a PC of mine would want to be involved with. While I am not sure that has changed, this article has certainly kindled an interest in them, for which I am most appreciative!

    Do you have any thoughts on those who follow the Six/Keeper from a culture with a less negative view vs someone who embraces the worship believing the negative view to be correct? The Droamite who worships the Keeper vs a previously (or still!) devout vassal who wants the all the terrible things the Keeper offers to do all the terrible things the Keeper is supposed to allow?

    Would you say those who approach the Six with the intention of getting something from a deity they believe to be evil tend to be worse than those who viewed them as less or not evil?

    How do Vassals and other devout reconcile the different views of the Six? If a vassal heard that Medusa talking about the Shadow would they think that both descriptions were true or that one of the two was wrong?

    As always, thanks for writing this!

    I did notice:
    “With that in ming, here’s a few options for the Watch.”
    And you referred to talons as fangs a few times in their section.
    Ex: “If a bargain has a material cost, the fang takes the goods on behalf of the Keeper.”

  10. So… hypothetically a 3.5 LG paladin of the Keeper should be possible, although it would be tricky to pull off. If you were to do that, what positive aspects of the Keeper would you emphasize? Or would you prefer they be a Paladin of the Restful Watch instead?

    • It’s a tough sell. I personally define the good alignments as reflecting empathy and altruism, and altruism is literally the antithesis of the Keeper. Even the Restful Watch doesn’t present the Keeper as an altruist; he’s just willing to work with Aureon, presumably profiting from the deal in some way. To me, the people who worship one of the Six above the Sovereigns don’t try to change the basic message of the Six, they simply embrace the darkness. The merchant who follows the Keeper is a mirror of the “Greed is Good” stockbroker, or the con artist who believes that if they can fool you, they’ve earned your gold. So personally, I’d go with the Restful Watch. 

      HOWEVER, if I absolutely had to make an LG paladin of the Keeper who wasn’t associated with the Restful Watch, I’d emphasize the role of the Talon. They help people make bargains with the Keeper. They don’t seek personal profit, and they offer the best advice they can to the prospective client. It could be that the paladin then acts to make the deal come true; if the Keeper has promised someone wealth, it’s up to the paladin to actual get it for them. So essentially, even though the Keeper always gets the best of the bargain, the paladin sees themselves as doing good by helping people make the deals to get what they need.

  11. So, I had an idea for a cult of god-complex Jorasco healers who worshipped the Keeper, but are there any other institutions that you think are ripe for Keeper worshippers?

    • Any merchant or institution that uses unscrupulous methods to gain profit may have fans of the Keeper among its staff. I could certainly see people in Cannith’s sales department carrying the Keeper’s token in their purses.

    • I’ve actually used kender in Eberron by making them chaotic fey associated with the concept of Childhood. That means they’re just as likely to be mischievous but friendly wanderous, thieving bully tricksters, or as a rare evil example, gleefully murderous psychopaths. Once you establish them as fairytale characters from Thelanis rather than a race of humanoid, it’s a lot easier for players to accept their otherwise disruptive hijinks.

      Don’t make them playable, though.

    • The unwritten part of “there’s a place” is “… if you want there to be.” I don’t have Kender in MY Eberron. But if you wanted them in yours, there’s lots of ways to do it. You could follow the other suggestion in this thread; say they’re halflings touched by Thelanis (either due to a manifest zone or a bargain). You could say that they were created by Mordain the Fleshweaver as an experiment. You could just pick a place in Khorvaire and say that they’re an offshoot of the halfling species. They aren’t in MY Eberron, but it would be easy enough to drop them in.

      • I’d say nobody wants them to be anywhere, but for some reason Wizards (apparently) considered them during the 5E playtest

  12. Loved the article! Quick question, out of curiosity: I love the idea of people burying treasures with the dead to distract the Keeper. If this is a common practice for everyone in Eberron, would you think it would lead to extensive grave robbing by non-believers? Is there some “curse” rumored to go with grave robbing?

    And how does the fact that the treasure is (presumably) still with the body when it is disinterred square with it being a distraction to the Keeper — I suppose the idea is that “he” admires it, but doesn’t directly take it to his hoard?

    • Good question. It’s definitely seen as a bad idea to steal grave goods—even if the Keeper doesn’t physically take them, his eye has been on them and by taking them you’re drawing his eye to you. However, that’s only going to deter vassals; if someone doesn’t believe in the Keeper, they won’t believe in the curse. With that said, bear in mind that for MOST people we aren’t talking about things of tremendous value—a few copper crowns, something that was valuable to the deceased but doesn’t necessarily have high market value. if the thing that was most valuable to the deceased was a portrait of their lost child, that might suffice… even though you couldn’t get a great price for it. Beyond that, this is one of the specific duties of the Restful Watch—maintaining and protecting cemeteries.  And in the case of someone who would be buried with things of considerable value—a noble, a hero—you would have crypts with actual security. 

      All of which leads to possible adventure: You need to get into the crypt of first King of Metrol to recover the sword that was buried with him… but is its power intact, or is it now cursed? 

  13. Great post, Keith! Quick question — if burial with valuables is a common practice in Eberron, how do you handle grave robbers? Are there rumored curses if people steal the “Keeper’s” treasure? Do people tend to guard their dead? Are there elaborate Egyptian-style tombs to guard the riches of kings?

  14. I see a lot of people conclude that, since the Mournland matches Cyre’s artificial and arbitrary borders (very recent ones at that, as Darguun and Valenar weren’t hit) , some intelligent force had to be behind it (instead of of being a random magical event). Is this what in-universe people think?

    • There’s many in-world theories as to what caused the Mourning. But yes, this is certainly something that people in the world feel has to be linked to the explanation. If you look to the novel The Fading Dream, you have one example of people in-world advancing a theory that reflects the seemingly targeted borders, though it’s not a popular theory.

  15. Does the Restful Watch share most Vassals’ opinion of items like Keeper’s Fangs, that they are anathema and to be destroyed, or are there times a cleric of the Restful Watch would trap a soul rather than let it pass?

    Is this only something a heretical member might do?

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